Crisis in Iraq

Take Action

Write a Letter to the Editor

Write a Letter to the Editor

Write a letter to the editor to call for political solutions, not more bombing. This is also an important opportunity to remind the public, media and policymakers how diplomacy can prevent war before it starts.

Five Ways the U.S. Can Help Stop the Killing in Iraq

There is no evidence that air strikes could do what 160,000 troops could not: creating lasting peace and stability in Iraq. The United States' invasion of Iraq in 2003 caused some of the instability leading to the current crisis -- and further military intervention will only lead to more violence. But the U.S. could have a role in creating space for diplomacy and minimizing harm to civilians. Here's what the U.S. should do:

  1. Reject another U.S. military intervention
  2. Halt unconditional military aid to Iraq
  3. Convene a conference to establish a comprehensive arms embargo to Iraq and Syria
  4. Publicly support a political settlement between key parties in the conflict
  5. Increase and better allocate humanitarian funds to address the humanitarian crisis

Updates and More Information

Iraq Veterans to Congress: Don't Make the Same Mistakes Again

Iraq Veterans to Congress: Don't Make the Same Mistakes Again

FCNL's Matt Southworth was stationed just outside Tal Afar in 2004. A decade later, he points out that the same generals and political figures calling for war in 2003 are again supporting military intervention. Another way is possible.

Michael Shank and Yemi Melka in U.S. News and World Report

Michael Shank and Yemi Melka in U.S. News and World Report

If America really wants to help Iraq’s security situation, it would work with Saudi Arabia, Iran and others to issue an embargo on all weapons trafficking and arms exports into Iraq and Syria. That directly implicates the U.S. due to its weapons shipments to fractious Syrian rebels and unconditional military aid to Iraq.

FCNL on NBC

FCNL on NBC

FCNL's Matt Southworth notes that foreign military intervention, especially if led by the United States, will only harden the resolve of the radicals and unite the less religiously motivated.

FCNL on The Big Picture

FCNL on The Big Picture

FCNL's Michael Shank and Win Without War's Stephen Miles spoke with Thom Hartmann about the emerging crisis in Iraq on June 12. Michael noted that the U.S. is largely responsible for political conditions that made the rise of ISIS possible.

About Us
Sign Up
Donate

Press Room »

Events »

Blogs »

Work at FCNL »

Programs for
Young Adults »

Email Options »

© 2014 FCNL | 245 Second St, NE, Washington, DC 20002
202-547-6000 | Toll Free 800-630-1330